Brazilian Coconut Cookie

Coconut is a staple fruit to the Brazilian culture as well as the cuisine. When the Portuguese arrived in Brazil in the 1500s they brought with them many of their European ingredients and baking traditions. The imported sugar and local coconut created many varieties of baked goods. The coconut cookie or biscoito as it is called in Portuguese, is a great representation of this. Gozar!

 

Fun Fact: As a staple fruit to Brazilian culture, coconut is used in many other recipes. One such recipe is quejadinhas, a coconut and cheese snack, popular among children. Children may take quejadinhas to school as part of their lunch. These treats do not need to be heated and, if stored correctly, they stay fresh for several days.

 

American Chocolate Chip Cookie

 In 1938, Ruth Grays Wakefield, accidentally invented the Chocolate Chip Cookie when she ran out of baker's chocolate. In place of baker’s chocolate, she used Nestle's Chocolate Chips, however the chocolate chips did not melt. From then on, the most famous American cookie was born. After acquiring Wakefield’s recipe, originally referred to as “Butterdrop Do Cookies,” Nestle paid her with a lifetime supply of chocolate from Nestle. Enjoy!

 

Fun Fact: The chocolate chip cookie is America’s favorite cookie. Fifty-three percent of American adults prefer chocolate chip cookies over peanut butter cookies (16 percent), oatmeal cookies (15 percent), and any other variety. No wonder there are 7 billon chocolate chip cookies eaten in the U.S. every year, with about 50% being homemade cookies.


 

                                                                    

        Ingredients: King Arthur All Purpose Flour, Organic Eggs, Organic Butter, Organic Cane Sugar, 42% Chocolate Chips (fairtrade) and 60 % Bittersweet Chocolate Chips, Light Brown Sugar, Organic Vanilla Extract, Baking Soda & Powder, Sea Salt

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Scottish Oatmeal Bran Cookie

 

Scottish highlanders carried oats with them for sustenance  which gave them vigor in battle.  In the 1800s they began to use oats in confectionary items, such as cookies. The Scots use oats today in a variety of their recipes, but the most popular have been Oatmeal Cookies. Enjoy!

 

Fun Fact: Oats are not only a great source of nutrition, but also have many other uses such as neutralizing odors, relieving a dog’s itchy skin, and also treat one’s Poison Ivy and Chicken Pox itch. 

                 

    Ingredients: Organic Whole Wheat Flour, Organic Rolled Oats, Organic Bran, Organic Eggs, Organic Butter, Raisins, Honey, Pecans, Organic Cane Sugar, Organic Cinnamon, Organic Vanilla Extract, Baking Soda, Baking Powder, Sea Salt

Triple Chocolate Himalayan Sea Salt Cookie

 The salt ranges in the Himalayas date back to over 800 million years ago. The salt was formed from the marine fossil deposits during the Jurassic Period. Himalayan sea salt is said to have healing powers due to its purity. To this day the salt is extracted, crushed, and cleaned by hand, and then dried out in the sun - tradition that has existed since it was discovered.  आनन्द ! (Enjoy!)                                                             

 

Italian Spiced Biscotti

 

Biscotti’s date back to Ancient Rome, when travelers would carry with them these dense and dried out cookies. The cookie became popular during the Renaissance period in Tuscany, where a baker sold these crunchy, twice baked cookies with a local wine, Vin Santo. They were the perfect cookie to soak up liquid. Today, biscotti’s continue to be a popular cookie to enjoy with coffee, tea, or and even an Italian sweet wine. Godere (Enjoy)!

                                                

Ingredients: King Arthur All Purpose Flour, Organic White Whole Wheat Flour, Organic Bran, Organic Eggs, Organic Butter, Honey, Coconut Oil, Pecans, Organic Cane Sugar, Organic Cinnamon, Nutmeg, Allspice, Ginger, Organic Vanilla Extract, Sea Salt